The Shameful History of Fed Ed

jimi thing

Department of Education Organization Act

On October 17, 1979 President James E. Carter signed the Department of Education Organization Act. It replaced the
Office of Education with a department proper, and
installed a secretary at its head. 
On the Ed.gov website, they claimed the following purposes of the department:
  1. to strengthen the Federal commitment to ensuring access to equal educational opportunity for every individual;
  2. to supplement and complement the efforts of States, the local school systems and other instrumentalities of the States, the private sector, public and private educational institutions, public and private nonprofit educational research institutions, community-based organizations, parents, and students to improve the quality of education;
  3. to encourage the increased involvement of the public, parents, and students in Federal education programs;
  4. to promote improvements in the quality and usefulness of education through federally supported research, evaluation, and sharing of information;
  5. to improve the coordination of Federal education programs;
  6. to improve the management and efficiency of Federal education activities, especially with respect to the process, procedures, and administrative structures for the dispersal of Federal funds, as well as the reduction of unnecessary and duplicative burdens and constraints, including unnecessary paperwork, on the recipients of Federal funds; and
  7. to increase the accountability of Federal education programs to the President, the Congress and the public. (Section 102, Public Law 96-88)
In the 1860s, a budget of $15,000 and four employees handled education fact-finding.
By 1965, the Office of Education had more than 2,100 employees and
a budget of $1.5 billion. As of mid-2010, the Department has nearly
4,300 employees and a budget of about $60 billion.

So, what’s to show from the last 40 years?

failure-arrows

Results of U.S. Department of Education:

Despite dramatic increases in federal intervention and funding in the public education system since the 1960s, educational achievement has not improved. The most widely used measure of school achievement are scores from National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), which shows no significant change. Efforts to improve educational outcomes for low income children have also been expensive and unproductive. Even the federal college grant and loan programs have been ineffective for students. The evidence is inarguable, the federal government’s intervention in education has been a dismal failure.

 

WHAT CAN BE DONE?

Elimination of federal intervention can be achieved in five steps:
  1. Send all Program Management and Funding to the states including Pell Grants for college.
  2. Repeal all laws permitting federal intervention in K-12 education starting with ESSA.
  3. Privatize college loan programs through savings & loan institutions.
  4. Eliminate all offices and divisions in the US Department of Education and related spending.
  5. Reduce federal tax collection, shifting education revenue responsibilities entirely back to the states.

READ BLUEPRINT TO CLOSE USED

We urgently need a hearing on a bill to terminate the Department of Education, such as H.R.899. Contacting your elected officials is the earnest beginning of this conversation. Please contact your US Congressional Representative and ask if they will support H.R.899 to abolish the US Dept. of Ed.

HOW TO CONTACT ELECTED OFFICIALS

 

 

Stop Fed Ed Horz Logo

It is the mission of USPIE to restore parental & local control of education by eradicating federal intrusion. Although this experiment with federal control of local public schools has gone on for half a century now, it has failed. We need to stop treating children like guinea pigs in some social engineering laboratory & start embracing children as human beings to be supported and inspired to achieve their own dreams and aspirations.

DONATE TODAY!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s